CURRICULUM VITAE—CARL FREEDMAN
[March 2017]

Academic Position:
  • Russell B. Long Professor of English
  • Faculty Member, Program in Film and Media Arts
  • Faculty Member, Program in Comparative Literature
    Louisiana State University



    Contact Information:
  • Campus Address:
         Department of English, Louisiana State University,
         Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA
  • Campus Telephone: (225) 578-4086
  • E-mail Address: CFREED2780@gmail.com



    Education:
  • 1983: Ph.D. in English, Yale University
  • 1975: B.A. in English, Oxford University
  • 1973: B.A. with Highest Honors in English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



    History of Academic Positions:
  • 2014-present: Russell B. Long Professor of English, Louisiana State University
  • 2012-2014: James F. Cassidy Professor of English, Louisiana State University
  • 2001-2012: Professor of English, Louisiana State University
  • 1989-2001: Associate Professor of English, Louisiana State University
  • 1984-1989: Assistant Professor of English, Louisiana State University
  • 1983-1984: Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow, Center for the Humanities, Wesleyan University



    Academic Honors:
  • 2016: Tiger Athletic Foundation Undergraduate Teaching Award, Louisiana State University (several such awards given annually, with $2000 cash prize)
  • 2015: Manship Summer Research Grant, Louisiana State University
  • 2014-present: Russell B. Long Professorship, Louisiana State University
  • 2013-2014: ATLAS (Awards to Louisiana Artists and Scholars) Grant awarded by the Louisiana Board of Regents to support me during the academic year in pure research
  • 2013: 2012 Distinguished Research Master of Arts, Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Louisiana State University (one such award given annually, with $2500 annualized salary supplement)
  • 2012-present: James F. Cassidy Professorship, Louisiana State University
  • 2012: Manship Summer Research Grant, Louisiana State University
  • 2009: Regents Research Grant, Louisiana State University
  • 2008: LSU Foundation Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award (one such award given annually, with $1500 cash prize).
  • 2004: Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award (voted by the English Graduate Student Association, Louisiana State University).
  • 2003: Manship Summer Research Grant, Louisiana State University
  • 2002: Excerpt from Critical Theory and Science Fiction chosen as featured text for discussion at the Theory Roundtable of the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (Ft. Lauderdale, Florida; March 2002)
  • 2002: Regents Research Grant, Louisiana State University
  • 2001: Critical Theory and Science Fiction named an Outstanding Academic Book of 2000 by Choice
  • 1999: Pioneer Award for Excellence in Scholarship from the Science Fiction Research Association (awarded for the best article in science-fiction criticism annually; winning article: “Kubrick’s 2001 and the Possibility of a Science- Fiction Cinema”)
  • 1994: Summer Faculty Research Stipend, Louisiana State University
  • 1992: Manship Summer Research Grant, Louisiana State University
  • 1989: Summer Faculty Research Stipend, Louisiana State University
  • 1985: Summer Faculty Research Stipend, Louisiana State University
  • 1984: Margaret Church Modern Fiction Studies Memorial Prize for best article to appear in the journal during the year (winning article: "Antinomies of 1984”)
  • 1983-1984: Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Wesleyan University



    Publications:

    I. Authored Books:
  • Art and Idea in the Novels of China Miéville (Canterbury, UK: Gylphi Press, 2015).
  • Versions of Hollywood Crime Cinema: Studies in Ford, Wilder, Coppola, Scorsese, and Others (Bristol, UK and Chicago, USA: Intellect Books, 2013).
  • The Age of Nixon: A Study in Cultural Power (Winchester, UK: Zero Books, 2012).
    [See also Andrew Lawless, “The Age of Richard Nixon—a study in cultural power” (an extended interview with me), Three Monkeys Online, May 21, 2013]
  • The Incomplete Projects: Marxism, Modernity, and the Politics of Culture (Middletown: Wesleyan University Press, 2002).
  • Critical Theory and Science Fiction (Hanover and London: Wesleyan University Press and University Press of New England, 2000). Named an Outstanding Academic Book of 2000 by Choice.
  • George Orwell: A Study In Ideology and Literary Form (New York and London: Garland, 1988).

    II. Edited Books:
  • Conversations with Samuel R. Delany (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009). Edited, with an introduction, other prefatory material, and one new interview.
  • Conversations with Ursula K. Le Guin (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2008). Edited, with an introduction, other prefatory material, and one new interview.
  • Conversations with Isaac Asimov (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2005). Edited, with an introduction and other prefatory material.

    III. Special Issues of Journals:
  • Special issue of PMLA on “Science Fiction and Literary Studies: The Next Millennium” (May 2004) (co-coördinated with Marleen S. Barr).
  • Special issue of Science-Fiction Studies on Philip K. Dick (July 1988) (co-edited with George Slusser).

    IV. Articles:
  • “Character and Capital in the Wall Street Films of Oliver Stone,” forthcoming in Film International.
  • “American Civilization and Its Discontents: The Persistence of Evil in Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt,” in The Cambridge Companion to Alfred Hitchcock, ed. Jonathan Freedman (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015), pp. 92-105.
  • ​“Capitalist Realism in Three Recent Science-Fiction Films,” Paradoxa, #26 (December 2014), pp. 67-80.
  • “From Genre to Political Economy: Miéville’s The City & The City and Uneven Development,” CR: The New Centennial Review Vol. 13, # 2 (fall 2013), pp. 13-30.
  • "Notes on Benjamin, Adorno, Mann, and the Cinema of Michael Haneke," Film International, #57 (2012:3), pp. 16-35.
  • “Hobbes after Marx, Scorsese After Coppola: On GoodFellas,” in Film International, #49 (2011:1), pp. 42-62.
  • “The Supplement of Coppola: Primitive Accumulation and the Godfather Trilogy,” in Film International, #49 (2011:1), pp. 8-41. [This item and the preceding one form a special section, "Gangsterism and Capitalism," which also includes a brief introduction by me and which constitutes most of the issue.]
  • “Marxism, Cinema, and Some Dialectics of Science Fiction and Film Noir,” in Red Planets: Marxism and Science Fiction, ed. Mark Bould and China Miéville (London: Pluto Press, 2009), pp. 66-82.
  • “The End of Work: From Double Indemnity to Body Heat,” in Neo-Noir, ed. Mark Bould, Kathrina Glitre, and Greg Tuck (London & New York: Wallflower Press, 2009), pp. 61-74.
  • “Marxism and Science Fiction,” in Reading Science Fiction, ed. James Gunn, Marleen S. Barr, and Matthew Candelaria (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), pp. 120-132.
  • “Post-Heterosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity,” Film International, #25 (2007:1), pp. 16-31.
  • “Speculative Fiction and International Law: The Marxism of China Miéville,” Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 20, No. 3 (November 2006), pp. 25-39.
  • “About Delany Writing: An Anatomical Meditation,” Extrapolation, Summer 2006, pp. 16-29.
  • “An American Tragedy: On Oliver Stone’s Nixon,” Film International, #19 (2006:1), pp. 14-23.
  • “To the Perdido Street Station: The Representation of Revolution in China Miéville’s Iron Council,” Extrapolation, Summer 2005, pp. 235-248. Reprinted in New Boundaries in Political Science Fiction, ed. Donald M. Hassler and Clyde Wilcox (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2008), pp. 259-271.
  • “Versions of the American Imperium in Three Westerns by John Ford,” Film International, #18 (2005:6), pp. 14-25.
  • “Samuel Delany: A Biographical and Critical Overview,” in A Companion to Science Fiction, ed. David Seed (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005), pp. 398-407.
  • “Foreword” to re-issue of Samuel Delany, Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand (Middletown: Wesleyan University Press, 2004) pp. xi-xiv.
  • “Polemical Afterword: Some Brief Reflections on Arnold Schwarzenegger and on Science Fiction in Contemporary American Culture,” PMLA, May 2004, pp. 539-546.
  • “Towards a Marxist Urban Sublime: Reading China Miéville’s King Rat,” Extrapolation, Winter 2003, pp. 395-408.
  • “Memories of Holden Caulfield—And of Miss Greenwood,” The Southern Review, Spring 2003, pp. 401-417. Reprinted in Harold Bloom, ed., Bloom’s Modern Critical Interpretations: J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye— New Edition (New York: Bloom’s Literary Criticism, 2009), pp. 167-182.
  • “A Note on Marxism and Fantasy,” Historical Materialism, vol. 10:4 (2002), pp. 261-271.
  • “London as Science Fiction: A Note on Some Images from Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Dickens, and Orwell,” Extrapolation, Fall 2002, pp. 251- 262.
  • “Science Fiction and the Two Cultures: Reflections After the Snow-Leavis Controversy,” Extrapolation, Fall 2001, pp. 207-217. Reprinted in Science Fiction and the Two Cultures: Essays on Bridging the Gap Between the Sciences and the Humanities, ed. Gary Westfahl and George Slusser (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009), pp. 11-21.
  • “Science Fiction and Utopia: A Historico-Philosophical Overview,” in Learning from Other Worlds: Estrangement, Cognition and the Politics of Science Fiction and Utopia, ed. Patrick Parrinder (Liverpool, UK: Liverpool University Press, 2000; and Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001), pp. 72-97.
  • “Kubrick’s 2001 and the Possibility of a Science-Fiction Cinema,” Science- Fiction Studies, July 1998, pp. 300-318 [winner of the Pioneer Award for Excellence in Scholarship from the Science Fiction Research Association] [reprinted in Linda Pavlovski, ed., Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism 112 (Farmington Hills, Michigan: Gale Group, 2002), pp. 251-261] [reprinted, in Russian translation, in Theory of Science-Fiction Film, ed. Natalia Samutina, (Moscow: New Literary Observer Publishing House, 2006), pp. 345-366].
  • “Remembering the Future: Science and Positivism from Isaac Asimov to Gregory Benford,” Extrapolation, Summer 1998, pp. 128-138.
  • “The Case Against the Case Against Space--And a Case for Science Fiction,” Science-Fiction Studies, March 1998, pp. 143-152.
  • “Rhetorical Hermeneutics, Huckleberry Finn, and Some Problems with Pragmatism,” in Reconceptualizing American Literary/Cultural Studies, ed. William E. Cain, (New York: Garland, 1996), pp. 111-121.
  • “Science Fiction and the Question of the Canon,” in Science Fiction and Market Realities, ed. Gary Westfahl, George Slusser, and Eric Rabkin, (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1996), pp. 117-127.
  • “How to Do Things with Milton: A Study in the Politics of Literary Criticism,” in Critical Essays on John Milton, ed. Christopher Kendrick (New York: G.K. Hall, 1995), pp. 19-44.
  • “Theory, the Canon and the Politics of Curricular Reform: A Response to Gerald Graff,” in Teaching the Conflicts: Gerald Graff, Curricular Reform, and the Culture Wars, ed. William E. Cain (New York: Garland, 1994), pp. 53-66.
  • “Beyond the Dialect of the Tribe: James Joyce, Hugh MacDiarmid, and World Language,” in Hugh MacDiarmid: Man and Poet, ed. Nancy K. Gish (Edinburgh and Orono, Maine: Edinburgh University Press and the National Poetry Foundation, 1992), pp. 253-273.
  • “Style, Fiction, Science Fiction: The Case of Philip K. Dick,” in Styles of Creation: Aesthetic Technique and the Creation of Fictional Worlds, ed. George Slusser and Eric Rabkin (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992), pp. 30-43.
  • “Louisiana Duce: Notes Toward a Systematic Analysis of Postmodern Fascism in America,” Rethinking Marxism, Spring 1992, pp. 19-31.
  • “Forms of Labor in Dashiell Hammett's Red Harvest,” PMLA, March 1991, pp. 209-221 [co-authored with Christopher Kendrick]. Reprinted in The Critical Response to Dashiell Hammett, ed. Christopher Metress (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1994), pp. 12-29.
  • “England as Ideology: From Upstairs Downstairs to A Room with a View,” Cultural Critique, Winter 1990-91, pp. 79-106.
  • “The Interventional Marxism of Louis Althusser,” Rethinking Marxism, Fall-Winter 1990, pp. 309-328.
  • “Power, Sexuality, and Race in All the King's Men,” in Southern Literature and Literary Theory, ed. Jefferson Humphries (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1990), pp. 127-141.
  • “History, Fiction, Film, Television, Myth: The Ideology of M*A*S*H,” The Southern Review, Winter 1990, Vol. 26, No. 1, pp. 89-106.
  • “The Transformation Problem and Cultural Theory,” in Comparative Literature East and West: Traditions and Trends, ed. Cornelia N. Moore and Raymond A. Moody (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1989), pp. 22-28.
  • “The Mandarin Marxism of Theodor Adorno,” Rethinking Marxism, Winter 1988, pp. 85-111 [co-authored with Neil Lazarus][see also “Reply to Dan Kiamie and Rita DeSalvo,” Rethinking Marxism, Fall 1989, pp. 167-169].
  • “Philip K. Dick and Criticism,” Science-Fiction Studies, July 1988, pp. 121- 130. Reprinted in On Philip K. Dick, ed. R.D. Mullen, Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr., Arthur B.Evans, and Veronica Hollinger (Terre Haute & Greencastle: SF- TH Inc., 1992), pp. 145-153.
  • “Nietzsche and Ideology-Critique: A Note on Twilight of the Idols,” Rethinking Marxism, Summer 1988, pp. 103-114.
  • “Science Fiction and Critical Theory,” Science-Fiction Studies, July 1987, pp. 180-200 [see also “Another Response to John Fekete,” Science-Fiction Studies, March 1989, pp. 116-117].
  • “Marxist Theory, Radical Pedagogy, and the Reification of Thought,” College English, January 1987, pp. 70-82.
  • “Antinomies of Nineteen Eighty-four,” Modern Fiction Studies, Winter 1984, pp. 601-620 [winner of the Margaret Church MFS Memorial Prize]. Reprinted in Bernard Oldsey and Joseph Browne, eds., Critical Essays on George Orwell (Boston: G. K. Hall, 1986), pp. 90-109.
  • “Possibilities of a Political Aesthetic: The Case of Hugh MacDiarmid,” The Minnesota Review, Fall 1984, pp. 41-57.
  • “Overdeterminations: On Black Marxism in Britain,” Social Text, Winter 1983/84, pp. 142-150.
  • “Towards a Theory of Paranoia: The Science Fiction of Philip K. Dick,” Science-Fiction Studies, March 1984, pp. 15-24. Reprinted in On Philip K. Dick, ed. R.D. Mullen, Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr., Arthur B. Evans, and Veronica Hollinger (Terre Haute & Greencastle: SF-TH Inc., 1992), pp. 111- 118. Also reprinted in Philip K. Dick: Contemporary Critical Interpretations, ed. Samuel J. Umland (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1995), pp. 7-17.
  • “Writing, Ideology, and Politics: Orwell's ‘Politics and the English Language’ and English Composition,” College English, April 1981, pp. 327-340 [see also “Carl Freedman Responds,” College English, April 1983, pp. 412-414].

    V. Review-Articles:
  • “An Edward Said for SF Criticism?” [review of John Rieder, Colonialism And the Emergence of Science Fiction], Extrapolation, Spring 2010, pp. 176-183.
  • Untitled review-article on recent work about George Orwell, Historical Materialism, vol. 14:3 (2006), pp. 245-258.
  • “Connections of Late Capitalism: Steven Shaviro, Science Fiction, and the Network Society” [review of Steven Shaviro, Connected or What It Means to Live in the Network Society], Science-Fiction Studies, July 2004, pp. 271-282.
  • Untitled review-article on Veronica Hollinger and Joan Gordon, eds., Edging into the Future: Science Fiction and Contemporary Cultural Transformation, Extrapolation, Spring 2004, pp. 106-112.
  • “Hail Mary: On the Author of Frankenstein and the Origins of Science Fiction” [review of editions of and critical and biographical work on Mary Shelley], Science-Fiction Studies, July 2002, pp. 253-264.
  • “Adventures of the Dialectic: or, On Delany as Critic” [review of Samuel Delany, Shorter Views: Queer Thoughts and the Politics of the Paraliterary], Science-Fiction Studies, March 2001, pp. 107-118.
  • “Science Fiction and the Triumph of Feminism” [review of Marleen Barr, ed., Future Females, the Next Generation: New Voices and Velocities in Feminist Science Fiction Criticism], Science-Fiction Studies, July 2000, pp. 278-289.
  • “Lies, Damned Lies, and Science Fiction: Thomas M. Disch and the Culture of Mendacity” [review of Thomas M. Disch, The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World], Science-Fiction Studies, July 1999, pp. 324-331.
  • “In Search of Dick's Boswell” [review of recent biographical and bibliographical work on Philip K. Dick], Science-Fiction Studies, March 1991, pp. 104-109. Reprinted in On Philip K. Dick, ed. R.D. Mullen, Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr., Arthur B. Evans, and Veronica Hollinger (Terre Haute & Greencastle: SF-TH Inc., 1992), pp. 257-261.

    VI. Shorter Articles:
  • "Utopianism and Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer,Science Fiction Film and Television, Vol. 9, no. 1 (2016), pp. 84-86.
  • “Samuel R. Delany,” in Fifty Key Figures of Science Fiction, ed. Mark Bould et alia (London: Routledge, 2009), pp. 61-66.
  • “Isaac Asimov,” in Fifty Key Figures of Science Fiction, ed. Mark Bould et alia (London: Routledge, 2009), pp. 7-12.

    VII. Interview:
  • “A Conversation with Samuel R. Delany about Sex, Gender, Race, Writing—and Science Fiction,” in Afro-Future Females: Black Writers Chart Science Fiction’s Newest New-Wave Trajectory, ed. Marleen Barr (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008), pp. 191-235.

    VIII. Reviews:
  • Untitled review of Ewa Mazierska and Alfredo Suppia, eds., Red Alert: Marxist Approaches to Science Fiction Cinema, forthcoming in Science Fiction Film and Television.
  • Untitled review of China Miéville, This Census-Taker, in Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction, #125 (2016), pp. 106-109.
  • “Political Surrealism, Surreal Politics” [review of China Miéville, The Last Days of New Paris], Los Angeles Review of Books, 26 December 2016, 2076 words, here
  • Untitled review of China Miéville, Three Moments of an Explosion, in Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction, #123 (2016), pp. 119-122.
  • “A Useful Guide to American Science Fiction” [review of Eric Carl Link and Gerry Canavan (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to American Science Fiction], Science-Fiction Studies, November 2015, pp. 590-593.
  • Untitled review of China Miéville, Embassytown, in Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction, #112 (summer 2011), pp.79-83.
  • "Science Fiction and Its Others" [review of Paul Meehan, Tech-Noir and Fred Botting, Limits of Horror], Science-Fiction Studies, November 2011, pp. 528-530.
  • Untitled DVD Review of Patricio Guzmán (dir.), Nostalgia for the Light, Science Fiction Film and Television, Vol. 4, no. 2 (Autumn 2011), pp. 302-306.
  • “An Adorno for Our Time” [review of Darko Suvin, Defined by a Hollow: Essays on Utopia, Science Fiction and Political Epistemology], Extrapolation, Spring 2011, pp. 110-116.
  • Untitled DVD review of Gabriel Range (dir.), Death of a President, Science Fiction Film and Television, Vol. 2, no. 2 (Autumn 2009), pp. 327-332.
  • “No Breakthroughs, but One Good Essay” [review of James Holden and Simon King, Conceptual Breakthrough: Star/Alien], Science-Fiction Studies, November 2009, pp. 534-536.
  • Untitled review of James Naremore, On Kubrick, in Science Fiction Film and Television, Vol. 1, no. 1 (Spring 2008), pp. 133-138.
  • “The Science (Fiction) of Life” [review of special issue of Biography on “Life Writing and Science Fiction,” ed. John Rieder], Extrapolation, Spring 2008, pp. 159-163.
  • Untitled review of Diane Carson and Heidi Kenaga, eds. Sayles Talk: New Perspectives on Independent Filmmaker John Sayles, in Film International, #24 (2006:4), pp. 67-70.
  • Untitled review of China Miéville, Looking for Jake, in Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction, #97 (Summer 2006), pp. 108-113.
  • Untitled review of Mark Bould, Film Noir: From Berlin to Sin City, in Film International, #20 (2006:2), pp. 81-83.
  • “Fantastic Quest” [review of David Sandner, ed., Fantastic Literature: A Critical Reader], Science-Fiction Studies, November 2005, pp. 537-540.
  • Untitled review of Kim Stanley Robinson, Forty Signs of Rain, in Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction, #95 (Autumn 2005), pp. 125-130.
  • “Racing Delany” [review of Jeffrey Allen Tucker, A Sense of Wonder: Samuel R. Delany, Race, Identity, and Difference], Science- Fiction Studies, November 2004, pp. 476-479.
  • Untitled Review of Susan Lederer, Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature, in Isis: Journal of the History of Science Society, September 2003, pp. 506-507.
  • “Thought, Imagination, and C. S. Lewis” [review of Kathryn Lindskoog, Sleuthing C. S. Lewis: More Light in the Shadowlands and Mineko Honda, The Imaginative World of C. S. Lewis: A Way to Participate in Reality], Science-Fiction Studies, March 2003, pp. 141-143.
  • “Apocalypse Often” [review of Jerome Shapiro, Atomic Bomb Cinema: The Apocalyptic Imagination on Film], Science-Fiction Studies, November 2002, pp. 515-520.
  • Untitled Review of Tom Moylan, Scraps of the Untainted Sky: Science Fiction, Utopia, Dystopia, in Extrapolation, Summer 2002, pp. 237-241.
  • “Subversion in the Time of the Cleavers” [review of M. Keith Booker, Monsters, Mushroom Clouds, and the Cold War: American Science Fiction and the Roots of Postmodernism, 1946-1964], Science-Fiction Studies, March 2002, pp. 112-116.
  • Untitled Review of David Cochran, America Noir: Underground Writers and Filmmakers of the Postwar Era, in Paradoxa: Studies in World Literary Genres, #16, February 2002, pp. 236-241.
  • “The ABCs of Science Fiction” [review of Adam Roberts, Science Fiction and Andrew Butler, The Pocket Essential Cyberpunk], Science-Fiction Studies, November 2001, pp. 443-447.
  • “Superman Among the Stars” [review of Leonard F. Wheat, Kubrick’s 2001: A Triple Allegory], Science-Fiction Studies, July 2001, pp. 296-299.
  • Untitled Review of Marleen Barr, Genre Fission: A New Discourse Practice for Cultural Studies, in Extrapolation, Summer 2001, pp. 192-195.
  • “An Anatomy of Hope” [review of Samuel Delany, 1984: Selected Letters], Science-Fiction Studies, November 2000, pp. 523-526.
  • “Of Cities and Bodies” [review of Samuel Delany, Times Square Red, Times Square Blue and Bread & Wine: An Erotic Tale of New York], Science-Fiction Studies, July 2000, pp. 356-357.
  • “A Biology of Art?” [review of Bret Cooke & Frederick Turner, eds., Biopoetics: Evolutionary Explorations in the Arts], Science-Fiction Studies, March 2000, pp. 170-172.
  • “Bold Interdisciplinary Speculation” [review of Gregory Benford, Deep Time: How Humanity Communicates Across Millennia], Science-Fiction Studies, March 2000, pp. 174-175.

    IX. Encyclopedia and Symposium Entries:
  • “Remembering Mark Fisher,” forthcoming in Los Angeles Review of Books.
  • “A Science Fiction of Finance Capital?” (Entry in Symposium on Globalization and Science Fiction), Science-Fiction Studies, November 2012, p. 379.
  • Entry in Special Section on Science-Fiction Criticism, Extrapolation, Spring 2009, pp. 12-13.
  • Frank McConnell, R.I.P.: An Eaton Memory,” in Frank McConnell, The Science of Fiction and the Fiction of Science: Collected Essays on SF Storytelling and the Gnostic Imagination, ed. Gary Westfahl (Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009), pp. 168-169.
  • Entry in Roundtable on Science-Fiction Criticism, Science-Fiction Studies, November 2006, pp. 394-395.
  • Entry on Perdido Street Station by China Miéville, The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy, ed. Gary Westfahl (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2005), Vol. 3, pp. 1200-1202.
  • Entry on Philip K. Dick, Encyclopedia of Literature and Politics, ed. M. Keith Booker (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2005), Vol. 1, pp. 210-202.
  • Entry in Symposium on Jules Verne, Science-Fiction Studies, March 2005, pp. 173-174.
  • “The Strongest Link: Science Fiction as Social Register,” Symposium on Social Science Fiction, Science-Fiction Studies, July 2003, pp. 176-178.



    Major Academic Service:

    Local:
  • 2010: Member, Graduate Council, Louisiana State University
  • January 2006-August 2009: Director of Graduate Studies, Department of English, Louisiana State University
  • 1995-96, 1997-98, 1999-2000: Executive Committee, Department of English, Louisiana State University
  • 1989-90,
  • 1991-1993: Job Placement Officer, Department of English, Louisiana State University
  • 1989-90: Director, Graduate Humanities Program, Louisiana State University

    National & International:
  • 2014-present: Member, Editorial Board, Progress in Arts and Humanities
  • 2013-present: Member, Editorial Board, Advances in Literary Study
  • 2009-present: Member, Editorial Advisory Board of the How to Read Theory Series, Pluto Press
  • 2003-present: Member, Editorial Advisory Board, Historical Materialism
  • 2002: Chair, Science Fiction Discussion Group, Modern Language Association
  • 2000-present: Member, Board of Editors, Extrapolation
  • 1988-present: Manuscript Referee, Rethinking Marxism
  • 1987-present: Editorial Consultant, Science-Fiction Studies
  • 1985-1986: Reviewer for Choice
  • 1983-1992: Editorial Associate, Social Text



    Conference Papers and Invited Public Lectures:
  • “Capitalist Realism and Three Recent Science-Fiction Films,” Historical Materialism Conference (Eleventh Annual), November 2014 [London]. ​
  • “Capitalist Realism in Three Recent Science-Fiction Films,” paid keynote address at Conference on “SF/F Now,” University of Warwick, August 2014 [Coventry, UK].
  • “Nixon and Watergate,” paid invited lecture in the “Superpower” section of the Southbank Centre’s year-long The Rest Is Noise Festival; November 2013 [London].
  • “Notes on Benjamin, Adorno, Mann, and the Cinema of Michael Haneke,” paid lecture tour of Taiwan funded by the National Science Council of Taiwan; lectures given at the National Cheng Chi University (Taipei), at the National Chung Hsing University (Taichung), and at the National Cheng Kung University (Tainan); November 2012 [Taiwan].
  • "The Benjaminian Cinema of Michael Haneke," Historical Materialism Conference (Eighth Annual), November 2011 [London].
  • "From Genre to Political Economy: Miéville's The City & The City and Uneven Development," Eaton Science Fiction Conference, February 2011 [Riverside, California].
  • “Marxism, Cinema, and Some Dialectics of Science Fiction and Film Noir,” paid keynote address at Colloquium on "Explosive Past, Radiant Future," University of Toronto, March 2010 [Toronto]. Lecture delivered in absentia because of illness.
  • “General Reflections on Marxism and Science Fiction,” Historical Materialism Conference (Sixth Annual), November 2009 [London].
  • “Marxism, Cinema, and Some Dialectics of Science Fiction and Film Noir,” invited paid lecture in Spring 2009 CHASS Speaker Series on Science Fiction, University of California at Riverside, April 2009 [Riverside, California].
  • “Noir, Science Fiction, and Some Dialectics in Film,” Historical Materialism Conference on New Directions in Marxist Theory, November 2007 [London].
  • “Marxism, Cinema, and Some Dialectics of Science Fiction and Film Noir,” paid keynote address at Conference on Fantasy*Identity*Politics, University of Florida, October 2007 [Gainesville].
  • Between Equal Rights and Bas-Lag: The Marxism of China Miéville,” Historical Materialism Conference on New Directions in Marxist Theory, December 2006 [London].
  • “The End of Work: From Double Indemnity to Body Heat,” paid keynote address at Straub Symposium, University of Wisconsin, October 2006 [Madison].
  • “About Delany Writing: An Anatomical Meditation,” paid keynote address at Samuel R. Delany: A Critical Symposium, SUNY, March 2006 [Buffalo].
  • “To the Perdido Street Station: The Politics of China Miéville’s Iron Council,” Eaton Science Fiction Conference, May 2005 [Seattle].
  • “To the Perdido Street Station: The Literary Politics of China Miéville’s Iron Council,” International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, March 2005 [Ft. Lauderdale, Florida].
  • “The Marxist Urban Sublime of China Miéville,” Conference on Marxism on the World Stage, November 2003 [Amherst, Massachusetts].
  • “Rats and Spiders and the Beat Goes On: China Miéville’s Marxist Urban Sublime,” WisCon Conference on Feminist Science Fiction, May 2003 [Madison, Wisconsin].
  • “London as Science Fiction: A Note on Some Images from Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Dickens, and Orwell,” Conference on Literary Representations of London, July 2002 [London].
  • “The Erotic Poetry of Kenneth W. Starr,” Conference on Marxism 2000, September 2000 [Amherst, Massachusetts].
  • “Science Fiction and the Two Cultures: Reflections After the Snow-Leavis Controversy,” Eaton Science Fiction Conference, January 1999 [Riverside, California].
  • “Ernst Bloch and the Hope Principle in Contemporary Science Fiction,” MLA Convention, December 1998 [San Francisco].
  • “Samuel Delany and the Dialectics of Difference,” MLA Convention, December 1997 [Toronto].
  • “Remembering the Future: Science and Positivism from Isaac Asimov to Gregory Benford,” Joint Meeting of Eaton Science Fiction Conference and Science Fiction Research Association Conference, June 1997 [Long Beach, California].
  • “Towards Dialectical Journalism: Alexander Cockburn's Golden Age,” Conference on Politics and Languages of Contemporary Marxism, December 1996 [Amherst, Massachusetts].
  • “On Kubrick's 2001: The Quest for Generic Authority and the Possibility of a Science-Fiction Cinema,” Eaton Science Fiction Conference, April 1994 [Riverside, California].
  • “The Philosophical Future of Trotskyism,” Conference on Marxism in the New World Order: Crises and Possibilities, November 1992 [Amherst, Massachusetts].
  • “Louisiana Duce: Notes Toward a Systematic Analysis of Postmodern Fascism in America,” Tenth Annual Conference on Marxian Social Theory, April 1992 [Amherst, Massachusetts].
  • “Canon Fodder: Science Fiction, the Great Books, and the Literary Marketplace,” Eaton Science Fiction Conference, April 1990 [Riverside, California].
  • “Arabs, Yuppies, Revolutionaries: Joanna Russ's Feminist Dialectics,” MLA Convention, December 1989 [Washington].
  • “The Interventional Marxism of Louis Althusser,” Conference on Marxism Now: Traditions and Differences, December 1989 [Amherst, Massachusetts].
  • “Philip K. Dick--Stylist?”, Eaton Science Fiction Conference, April 1989 [Riverside, California].
  • “The Ideology of Upstairs Downstairs,” Popular Culture Association Conference, April 1989 [St. Louis].
  • “Marxist Theory and Radical Pedagogy,” College English Association Conference, April 1988 [New Orleans].
  • “The Transformation Problem and Cultural Theory,” Conference on Comparative Literature East and West, January 1988 [Honolulu].
  • “MacDiarmid and Joyce,” MLA Convention, December 1986 [New York].
  • “Science Fiction and Critical Theory,” MLA Convention, December 1985 [Chicago].
  • “Nietzsche and Ideology-Critique,” MLA Convention, December 1984 [Washington].
  • “Literature vs. Politics: Some Considerations on Liberal Humanism,” Southern Comparative Literature Association Conference, February 1984 [Knoxville].
  • “Science Fiction and Paranoia,” MLA Convention, December 1982 [Los Angeles].



    Teaching:

    Theory:
  • Modern Critical Theory (graduate and undergraduate)
  • Marxist Critical Theory (graduate and undergraduate)
  • Introduction to Humanities (graduate)
  • Marxism and Culture (undergraduate honors)
  • Marx’s Capital (graduate independent study)

    Film:
  • Science-Fiction Cinema (graduate and undergraduate)
  • John Wayne’s America (undergraduate)
  • The American Crime Film (undergraduate)
  • The Films of Alfred Hitchcock (undergraduate)
  • Noir Film and Fiction (undergraduate)

    Literature:
  • Modern Fiction (graduate and undergraduate)
  • Modern Poetry (graduate and undergraduate)
  • Science Fiction and Utopia (graduate and undergraduate)
  • Literature and Politics (graduate and undergraduate)
  • The Fiction of James Joyce (graduate)
  • The Fiction of Samuel Delany (graduate)
  • Modern Drama (undergraduate)
  • History of the English Novel, Part Two (undergraduate)
  • History of English Literature, Part Two (undergraduate)
  • History of American Literature, Part Two (undergraduate)
  • Contemporary American Fiction (undergraduate)
  • The Modern Epic Novel (undergraduate)
  • The Fiction of China Miéville (undergraduate)
  • Social Marginality and Literary Representation (undergraduate)
  • The Oxford Christian Novelists (undergraduate)
  • Noir Film and Fiction (undergraduate)
  • East European and Russian Science Fiction (graduate independent study)
  • Finnegans Wake (graduate independent study)
  • Cyberpunk Fiction (undergraduate independent study)
  • The Work of George Orwell (undergraduate independent study)
  • Introduction to Fiction (sophomore)
  • Introduction to Poetry and Drama (sophomore)
  • Introduction to Poetry (sophomore)
  • Introduction to Drama (sophomore)

    Language and Composition:
  • English Composition (freshman)
  • Political Writing (freshman)
  • English as a Foreign Language (Yale Summer Language Institute)



    Doctoral Dissertations and M.A. Theses Directed:
  • Peter Pappas, “Thrillology: Affective Intensities and the Everyday Spectacular in American Literature and Culture” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 24 November 2014).
  • Amanda Wicks, "The Imagined Space of After: Post-Apocalypse Narratives from 1980-2010" (doctoral dissertation in progress; co-directed with Lauren Coats).
  • Kristopher Mecholsky, “Adaptation as Anarchist: A Complexity Method for Ideology-Critique of American Crime Narratives” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 6 July 2012). Awarded the James Olney Distinguished Dissertation Award and the Lewis P. Simpson Distinguished Dissertation Award for a Dissertation in Literary History and Criticism.
  • Rich Cooper, “Radical Realms: A Materialist Theory of Fantasy Literature” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 25 April 2011).
  • Suparno Banerjee, “Other Tomorrows: Postcoloniality, Science Fiction and India” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 10 May 2010; co-directed with Pallavi Rastogi).
  • Joseph Brown, “The American Jeremiad in Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Century Science Fiction” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 23 March 2009).
  • Jennifer Farrell, “Synaptic Boojums: Lewis Carroll, Linguistic Nonsense, and Cyberpunk” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 15 June 2007).
  • Lisa Costello, “Who Speaks and Who Listens? Genre, Gender, and Memory in Holocaust Discourses” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 14 May 2007; co-directed with Katrina Powell). Awarded the Lewis P. Simpson Distinguished Dissertation Award for a Dissertation in Literary History and Criticism. Also awarded the Josephine A. Roberts Alumni Association Distinguished Dissertation Award in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences.
  • Dallas Hulsey, “The Iconography of Nationalism: Icons, Popular Culture, and American Nationalism” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 1 September 2005). Awarded the Lewis P. Simpson Distinguished Dissertation Award for a Dissertation in Literary History and Criticism.
  • Valerie Holliday, “Conspiracy Culture in America after World War II” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 28 March 2005 ).
  • Bradley Bankston, “Against Biopoetics: On the Use and Misuse of the Concept of Evolution in Contemporary Literary Theory.” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 3 November 2003). Awarded the Lewis P. Simpson Distinguished Dissertation Award for a Dissertation in Literary History and Criticism.
  • Anne-Marie Thomas, “It Came from Outer Space: The Virus, Cultural Anxiety, and Speculative Fiction” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 13 May 2002).
  • Amy Baria, “Within the Realm of Possibility: Magic and Mediation in Native American and Chicano/a Literature”(doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 8 May 2000).
  • Eamon Halpin, “The City as Body and Image: The Poetics of the City in Epic and Novelistic Literature” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 15 December 1994).
  • William Watson, “Imagining Workers: The Working-Class Presence in Late Nineteenth Century American Literature” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 18 November 1993; co-directed with Daniel Fogel).
  • Dennis Sutherland, “Splinters: American Film Heroes and the Vietnam War” (M.A. thesis successfully defended, 6 July 1992).
  • Erin Mooney, “Forging New Links: Sexuality and Subjectivity in Monique Wittig” (M.A. thesis successfully defended, 18 May 1990).
  • Jon Thompson, “Modernism's Illegitimate Progeny: Fictions of Crime and the Experience of Modernity” (doctoral dissertation successfully defended, 6 October 1989). Published as Fiction, Crime, and Empire: Clues to Modernity and Postmodernism (University of Illinois Press, 1993).